How To Be A Successful Esthetician

What tips do you have for a new esthetician right out of school? It is a fact that a large percentage of people who go through the effort and investment of attending and graduating from esthetics school will never end up practicing esthetics or will do so for a short time. I believe this is because they could not find a job or if they did, the job was not the right fit for them. Our advice is to explore every option for employment, but be sure to only apply for a position that best suits your style and personality.

What jobs are out there for estheticians? What we love about being an esthetician is that there are many options for places of employment. There are day spas, hair salons that have a skin treatment room, skin care spas, hotel spas, cruise line spas, medical spas, department store spas associated with a skin care line, resort spas and more. If you prefer not to be a service provider, there are still many options. You can become a representative for a skin care line that is sold to department stores, medical offices, or spas so you would provide education and training classes to your various accounts, as well as work at trade shows. You can work in a retail environment selling a line at the department store counter (they LOVE hiring estheticians) or other beauty retailers. You can also become an independent contractor and be on-call to work at various spas or even be a freelance esthetician. It is also possible to become an educator and work as a teacher at your local esthetics school. Another option is to become an entrepreneur and develop your own skin care line.

What I love most about a career as an esthetician is that it offers a very flexible schedule. Many places allow part and full-time schedules so if you have another career or have children, this is ideal. Many businesses have employed many estheticians who were once full-time and now work part-time after having children. One size does not fit all when it comes to being employed as an esthetician, so do you research.

How can an esthetician build a clientele? It truly takes a long, long time to really build up a good, repeat clientele. The reason is because you will not connect with every client, and not every client will connect with you. Being an esthetician is a relationship-based profession. Our best tip for this is to mimic their personality. If they are not much of a talker, then don’t talk their ear off. You have to be a chameleon with every client.

Try paying close attention to body language. Asking specific questions on your client intake form that gives you insight into their expectations will go a long way. One of our favorite questions is “What are you goals for today’s visit?” I then provide various options they can check off on the form ranging from “stress relief” to “I want to learn how to care for my skin.” Depending on all that they select, we will make sure to create an experience that gives them exactly what they ask for. I will also discuss their goals during our consultation to make sure we have complete clarity. Having a client leave getting exactly what they wanted will help build the relationship and ensure they will come back to see you again.

Another way to build a clientele is to give out free skin treatments. When you have an empty schedule, your goal is to fill it with clients. And waiting around for them to shell out money for a skin treatment that is often considered a luxury will leave you with an empty room and time on your hands. Make some really nice gift certificates and gift it to your friends, family, and anyone you come in contact with that you feel would be a good fit for you. Let them experience the services you provide at no charge because the more faces you can get your hands on, the more they can spread the word for you. Many of them may love the results and want to come back as a paying client. At the end of the appointment, give them a few of those free gift certificates and ask them to give it to their friends who they think would be a good client for you. Who would not love giving the gift of beautiful skin? Hands down, word of mouth with a referral will trump any other advertising or marketing opportunity. If you work this strategy long enough, and you give a treatment focused on managing expectations, you will no longer have an empty schedule. I promise.

How can I give the best service possible? We would like to expand more on the consultation portion of the service because we believe this is so important and often overlooked by many estheticians. The information we gain from asking clients questions about their skin and having them share their concerns is essential for problem-solving. This is the biggest area of weakness for so many estheticians. They are so focused on giving the actual skin treatment without really knowing what the clients concerns are. Aside from the questions  mentioned above, here are some others to ask after reviewing their client intake form. We find these really insightful to understanding my client and his/her skin so the best results can be focused on. We love to psychoanalyze their skin and these open it up great conversations.

 

What are your top three skin concerns in order of priority?

Is today a good, bad, or normal skin day for you? (This is important because if they say “this is a really bad day for me”, you need to understand what they personally consider to be bad.)

Do you consider yourself to have sensitive skin? Give me specific examples of how your skin acts sensitive? (Everyone will say their skin is sensitive, but you need to know exactly their type of sensitivity.)

How oily or dry is your skin?

If your skin is dry, do you actually get flaky or is it more of a tightness that you experience?

What type of blemishes do you get most often (cysts, pustules, papules, whiteheads/closed comedones)?

Where on your face do you get the majority of your blemishes?

When it comes to caring for your skin at home, do you like a very simple routine like cleanser and moisturizer or do you like to add in additional products to make a more comprehensive routine?

Prior to coming and seeing me, what have you done with your skin both at home or professionally? What kind of results did you get?

What are your specific goals for your visit today?